My Visit to a Landfill

My Visit to a Landfill

Last year over my winter holiday break from school, I visited a landfill in Pennsylvania where New York City’s trash ends up.

This may not sound like the most exciting—or picturesque, traditional, or pleasant—place to spend one’s holiday, and is certainly not as glamorous as a ski town or beach where some of my other classmates went, but I wanted to experience what the residents of the Yorkville will experience if the East 91st Marine Transfer Station is built.

 

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Environmental Justice - At What Cost to NYC's Children?

Environmental Justice - At What Cost to NYC's Children?

Asphalt Green is a jewel of a park in Yorkville on the Upper East Side of Manhattan sitting across from the Stanley Isaacs Public Housing Complex where some 1,000 low income black and Hispanic families live.

Today 400,000 children use the park every year. Although Asphalt Green provides many of its services for a fee, one third of its programs are free to the public. 

The Park is once again fighting for its survival as Mayor Bill de Blasio wants to turn part of it into an access ramp for a dump which will be situated right next to the park.  Mayor de Blasio calls it “Environmental Justice”.  He talks of the small marine transfer station that used to exist at the site and how the predominantly white Upper East Side and how all of Manhattan must be responsible for its own garbage.

What the Mayor doesn’t talk about is the Marine Transfer Station he is building will be as large as the Empire State Building’s footprint and ten stories tall

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